Bit.Code by Julius Popp



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Bit.Code

Bit.Code (screen version) is a project made for low-resolution screens.

It is devoted to the coding and decoding process of information. Black and white pixels, the 1s and 0s of basic binary digital code, are fixed in a specific pattern on vertical lines. Scrolling the lines vertically up and down, recodes the information of the screen, to display frequently used key words taken from recent web feeds of current news sites.

The work forms a part of the artist's 'Bit' series, creating visuals metaphors for how information is presented or created, then changes or dissipates. Like other works in the series, the artist uses a purposefully limited medium to represent these 'bits' of information - while past versions have used drops of water or reflected sunlight to form pixels, this new adaptation uses a limited number of screen pixels that can be moved next to each other. By rearranging the vertical pixel lines an infinite amount of inforamtion can be assambeled revealing words, all the rest of the abstract patterning can be evaluated as coded, inaccessible information. This raises the question of the perceptibility of information.

Bit.Code (screen version) is an adaptation of a project commissioned by the V&A, London for V&A for the exhibition Decode: Digital Design Sensations. It launches a brand new media facade at FACT, a legacy project of the Media Facades Festival.

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Julius Popp

Julius Popp is an artist based in Leipzig and New York.
His work often uses technology, resulting in interdisciplinary ventures which reach across the boundaries of art and science. An example of Popp’s work is Bitfall (2005).

Popp studied at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig and he won the Robot Choice Award in 2003. The Fraunhofer Institute, Bonn, and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT have both studied elements of Popp’s work which made unique advances in the field of artificial intelligence.

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